Most health technology is not there...yet

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There seems to be a slight problem in the digital healthcare industry. Ok well not a slight problem, a few massive gaps. In a recent Forbes article Todd Hixon discusses why healthcare practitioners are frustrated with digital health companies. And I am inclined to agree.

Healthcare practitioners have been encouraged, either by companies, their peers or the healthcare community to accept new technologies into their practices. Instead of assisting them in making valuable diagnostic decisions, simplifying their lives and making it, well, easier to deliver healthcare, it has been plagued with issues. Most of these technologies have usability issues, and do not deliver useable results to the practitioners. These systems are hard-to-use, are sometimes divided into multiple systems (i.e. no integration on multiple platforms), and they are not allowing practitioners to enable their patients to engage in their care. So digital healthcare is not being seen in a very pretty light.

I think this has its origin in a few places. Firstly the adoption of technology is at a very slow pace. In most other industries, like consumer electronics, aviation, automotive and automation, retail etc. there seems to be a much higher uptake on new technologies. These technologies have been positioned to reduce production times, increase sales, simplify their work etc. In healthcare, however, it is moving at a snail’s pace.

A review article published by England, Stewart and Walker discussed the problem of information technology adoption in healthcare. They found that organizational factors within healthcare as well as the delivery of products and services by vendors are to blame. Healthcare organizations seem to be very complex and tend to have fragmented internal structures. This can delay the adoption of new technologies, as well as hinder the implementation of a one-time digital solution. Health information technology is also relatively immature, can be complicated to implement, and are usually unable to show measurable benefits to healthcare practitioners or larger organizations.

The organizational aspects cannot be directly solved by the digital health industry (or can it?), but we do have the chance to provide simple-to-use technologies that are great for the user. It must show a direct benefit (saving time, reducing costs, improving patient participation in their care etc.) to the healthcare industry. Otherwise the adoption will continue to be painfully slow.

Technology must also assist in diagnoses, and simplify the decisions that have to be made by nurses, chiropractors, physicians or anybody else working directly with patients. If digital healthcare companies can show measurable diagnoses that can assist the healthcare industry, it will be much more readily accepted. This will inspire confidence in not only the practitioner, but also the digital healthcare industry as a whole.

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