Blog posts tagged in healthcare

Posted by on in Clinical Decision Support

A while ago I was at a panel discussion on the advantages and concerns of electronic health records at a conference in Boston, MA. A few weeks before, our family physician passed away at the age of 89. He practiced in the day’s before the internet and his mind was our search engine for any health related issues. With his death, three generations' health information also passed away. I can’t remember a computer on his desk, but he still remembered to phone me on my birthday, 21 years after he assisted my transition into this life.

He auscultated each member of my extended family’s hearts. He knew exactly how our hearts were beating. He was also available 24/7. Always ready to assist.

While listening to the discussion on electronic health records, I thought to myself how uncomplicated were the days before information systems. When you had access to a single person with a wealth of information, not only on you, but your whole extended family. The days where there was a direct link between the cost, value and outcome of the service you received.

There is a school of thought that we should move back to a system where we have a single point of entry into the healthcare system. A point with access to my extended medical history. A point that could effectively manage my health. But how realistic is that? We are a generation that’s on the move.

So, the idea of building a relationship with a virtual doctor came to my mind. Imagine my family could also visit the same “virtual” doctor for the next few generations. Imagine if this doctor could learn the in’s and out’s of each of my family members' health. Imagine if this virtual doctor would know exactly how each family member's heart sounds. If it can provide you with individual care and specialist advice from the comfort of your couch.

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Posted by on in Business Model

Every day I work with doctors, nurses, physician’s assistants and chiropractors. Many of these healthcare practitioners have their own practice, which in essence is still a business. And how do you effectively run a business on your own (with an assistant if you are lucky)? You wear many hats. You have to be the head of customer service, marketing, technology, information systems, financial administration, and not to forget the primary care practitioner who is supposed to see patients. This might sound familiar to many people who have started their own business, but in healthcare it is having a detrimental impact.

When your attention is divided among many different types of roles, you could get lost in a sea of administration. This could negatively impact your patients, or even your business. In a short survey done by SensiCardiac we found that half of Department of Transport (DOT) physical examiners don’t market themselves to carriers in their community. Half don’t use social media, and less than 30% actually post newsletters or blogs. And to be honest, who can blame them? When you have to perform assessments, do administrative tasks, and be the marketing manager, you will try and prioritize the service you are providing to your patients. But this might leave a few blind spots in your business strategy. You might be missing out on some fantastic ways to improve the way your patients feel about your service, reach a wider group of patients, and ensure that the care you are providing is the best that you can.

Healthcare practitioners are providing valuable primary care services to patients every day. Primary care is the first defence in ensuring that communities are healthy. I believe that this is the way towards a healthier general population. I also believe that this is linked to technology. Technology is supposed to simplify diagnostics, improve your care, and ensure that patients leave your practice healthier or with correct treatments. But most technology is just adding to the burden of administrative tasks that you need to perform in order to provide a great service. I think it is our challenge as technology leaders to ensure that primary care practitioners are receiving the best ways to diagnose patients, ensure that the diagnosis is provided in an easy-to-understand format, and stop us from overworking an already overworked part of our population. Let’s simplify their lives, and ensure that the many hats become less of a burden.

 

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Posted by on in Clinical Techniques

There seems to be a slight problem in the digital healthcare industry. Ok well not a slight problem, a few massive gaps. In a recent Forbes article Todd Hixon discusses why healthcare practitioners are frustrated with digital health companies. And I am inclined to agree.

Healthcare practitioners have been encouraged, either by companies, their peers or the healthcare community to accept new technologies into their practices. Instead of assisting them in making valuable diagnostic decisions, simplifying their lives and making it, well, easier to deliver healthcare, it has been plagued with issues. Most of these technologies have usability issues, and do not deliver useable results to the practitioners. These systems are hard-to-use, are sometimes divided into multiple systems (i.e. no integration on multiple platforms), and they are not allowing practitioners to enable their patients to engage in their care. So digital healthcare is not being seen in a very pretty light.

I think this has its origin in a few places. Firstly the adoption of technology is at a very slow pace. In most other industries, like consumer electronics, aviation, automotive and automation, retail etc. there seems to be a much higher uptake on new technologies. These technologies have been positioned to reduce production times, increase sales, simplify their work etc. In healthcare, however, it is moving at a snail’s pace.

A review article published by England, Stewart and Walker discussed the problem of information technology adoption in healthcare. They found that organizational factors within healthcare as well as the delivery of products and services by vendors are to blame. Healthcare organizations seem to be very complex and tend to have fragmented internal structures. This can delay the adoption of new technologies, as well as hinder the implementation of a one-time digital solution. Health information technology is also relatively immature, can be complicated to implement, and are usually unable to show measurable benefits to healthcare practitioners or larger organizations.

The organizational aspects cannot be directly solved by the digital health industry (or can it?), but we do have the chance to provide simple-to-use technologies that are great for the user. It must show a direct benefit (saving time, reducing costs, improving patient participation in their care etc.) to the healthcare industry. Otherwise the adoption will continue to be painfully slow.

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